Democrats fail to obtain documents over Donald Trump's impeachment trial


The first day of Donald Trump’s impeachment trial was devoted to setting the rules for the rest of the proceedings on Tuesday. If the Democrats obtained the time for the debates to be extended, they immediately failed to obtain documents from the administration.

The first day of Donald Trump’s impeachment trial was devoted to setting the rules for the rest of the proceedings on Tuesday. If the Democrats obtained the time for the debates to be extended, they immediately failed to obtain documents from the administration.
Democrats fail to obtain documents over Donald Trump's impeachment trial

On the first day of the trial for the removal of President Donald Trump from the Senate, the first task of the elected officials was to adopt a resolution to frame the course of this historic trial which, ten months before the presidential election, parasitized the campaign the White House. The hundred senators met on Tuesday, January 21, from 1 p.m.  at the Capitole, headquarters of the Congress in Washington.
The 53 Republican senators voted against the various motions tabled by the leader of the democratic minority, Chuck Schumer, aiming to demand documents from the White House, the State Department, the Pentagon and the office of Management and Budget linked in the Ukrainian file.
In this third impeachment trial in the history of the United States, parliamentarians must determine whether Donald Trump is guilty of abuse of power and of obstructing the proper functioning of Congress, as described in the Act of accusation adopted in December by the House of Representatives.
At the heart of the scandal: a phone call in July during which Donald Trump asked his Ukrainian counterpart, Volodymyr Zelensky, to investigate Joe Biden, his potential Democratic opponent for the November presidential election.
But before finally starting the debates on the indictment, they engaged in a tough showdown on the rules of the game. The Democrats accuse the Republican senators of organizing an acquittal at the pace of the President of the United States.
The leader of the Republican majority in the Senate Mitch McConnell introduced a resolution to frame this trial. On the program: three days of eight hours on average for the prosecution and as much for the defense so that they can present their arguments, then 16 hours for questions from senators.
"It's a fair roadmap for our trial," said influential Mitch McConnell, who makes no secret of his desire to offer the republican billionaire the quick acquittal he hopes for, ideally within two weeks.
Accused of wanting to organize a night trial when the Americans sleep, he however had to somewhat dilute the duration of this initial phase compared to a first proposal with forced march.

"Rigged trial"

Elected Adam Schiff, charged with laying the charge, blamed the presidential camp for holding a "rigged trial" in the Senate - when Republicans believe the Democrats have conducted a "rigged" investigation in the House of Representatives.
The issue is the crucial question of the key witnesses, the Democrats want to call and the documents they demand from the government. The Republicans want to postpone any decision on this until later.
Speaking of "national disgrace", the leader of the Senate Democrats Chuck Schumer introduced several amendments. But the first, calling immediately for documents from the White House, was rejected according to partisan lines: the 53 Republican senators voted against, the 47 Democrats for. A subsequent amendment, relating to State Department documents, suffered the same fate, as did another amendment to Pentagon documents. Another amendment dealing with the testimony of Mick Mulvaney, the acting White House chief of staff, was also rejected.
In total, and while debates continued late into the evening, five Democratic amendments have so far been rejected. With their majority, the Republicans can win all the procedural votes, as they are almost guaranteed to be able to acquit, ultimately, Donald Trump.

"Witch hunt"

"We need four Republicans who are ready to choose the side of justice", however had launched Chuck Schumer, courting the most moderate. "The Republican senators will be faced with a choice: to know the facts or to join Mitch McConnell and President Trump in their attempt to cover up."
During preliminary debates in the Senate, Pat Cipollone, legal adviser to the White House - who directs the defense of the president during the dismissal trial - denounced a trial which he considers unfounded. "The only conclusion will be that the president has done absolutely nothing wrong. (...) There is absolutely no business," he said.
On the other side of the Atlantic, Donald Trump, on arriving at the World Economic Forum in Davos on Tuesday, once again called his trial a "farce" and "a witch hunt".

Read More:




Share:

No comments:

Post a Comment

Note: Only a member of this blog may post a comment.

ad

Popular News

Recent Posts