He survived the Holocaust to die with the Coronavirus

One of the last Belgian survivors of the ‘Holocaust’ massacre, Henri Kishka, died of a Covid-19 epidemic.


One of the last Belgian survivors of the ‘Holocaust’ massacre, Henri Kishka, died of a Covid-19 epidemic. In 1945, Henry was taken on foot to a Nazi camp, where Nazi guards were sending camp prisoners starving in ‘death marches’ west as Soviet forces approached Nazi concentration camps in eastern and central Europe.
Corona virus: Auschwitz camp survivor Henry Kishka died from Covid-19
Kishka died on Saturday in a nursing home in the capital, Brussels, at the age of 94.
He was one of the few survivors to survive in the Nazi death camps ‘Auschwitz’ that were established in the southern part occupied by the Nazi forces in Poland during World War II.
Kishka talked to the BBC on January 2020 about his experience. ’You don't live in Auschwitz,’ he said of how he survived. ‘The place itself means death.’
‘A small microscopic virus succeeded while the entire Nazi army failed. My father survived the death march, but today his life has ended,’ Michel Kecca, Henry's son, wrote on his facebook page.
Henry Kiska was born in Brussels in 1926 to a Jewish family of Polish origin. His parents had fled after anti-Semitism spread in Eastern Europe to start a new life in the West.
When the Nazis invaded and occupied Belgium, the family had nowhere to hide in, and they were quickly deported in 1942.
Henry and his father worked as slaves while the women of the family, Henry's mother and sisters as well as his aunt, were taken to Auschwitz camps where they were killed with gas and their bodies cremated upon arrival at the site.
In 1945, Henry was taken on foot to a Nazi camp, where Nazi guards were sending camp prisoners starving in ‘death marches’ west as Soviet forces approached Nazi concentration camps in eastern and central Europe.
And for many years after the war, Henry never spoke of his experience.
He married Henry and then opened a store with his wife, forming a family, as he had four sons and daughters, nine grandchildren and 14 sons and daughters of grandchildren.
Later on, Henry began giving lectures in schools, and he felt it was worth the pain of memories to make sure that the world would not forget what had happened.
Sixty years after the war ended, Henry published his memoirs in the camps so that future generations would know what happened on his account, after his departure from this world.
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