How will the pandemic influence conflicts in the Middle East?

The wars in the Middle East have caused an unprecedented massive exodus and thousands of fatalities, now, the inhabitants of these territories must also face the Covid-19


The coronavirus is leaving thousands of dead and forcing humanity to confinement. Its impact on the Middle East wars is still uncertain although there is already a first consequence: the ceasefire in Yemen. The wars in the Middle East have caused an unprecedented massive exodus and thousands of fatalities, now, the inhabitants of these territories must also face the Covid-19.
How will the pandemic influence conflicts in the Middle East? 
Beirut News Update: - The coronavirus is leaving thousands of dead and forcing humanity to confinement. Its impact on the Middle East wars is still uncertain although there is already a first consequence: the ceasefire in Yemen.
In recent weeks, the United Nations (UN) has repeatedly called for a cessation of violence worldwide, including in the Middle East, to help slow the advance of Covid-19 and prevent further humanitarian dramas.

Yemen

The Saudi Arabian-led military coalition, which has intervened in Yemen since 2015 in support of government forces, announced a two-week ceasefire starting at 09:00 am Thursday, to prevent a spread of the coronavirus. The Houthi rebels, supported by Iran, did not react at the moment.
‘We are preparing the ground to fight Covid-19 disease,’ a Saudi official said on Wednesday.
Despite a call for a UN ceasefire in March, violence had recently escalated in the country.
The NGO's fear a catastrophe if the virus spreads, since Yemen has a poor health system and 24 million people (more than two thirds of the population), need humanitarian assistance, according to the UN.

Syria

The new coronavirus began to spread worldwide when a new truce came into effect in early March in and around Idlib province in northwestern Syria between the regime and its Russian ally, on the one hand, and jihadist and rebel groups, on the other.
In March, the number of civilian losses was the lowest since the start of the conflict in 2011 with 103 deaths, according to the Syrian Observatory for Human Rights (OSDH).
For the different actors on the ground - the regime, the Kurdish forces in the northeast and the anti-Damascus factions in Idlib - good management of the epidemic would strengthen their credibility.
‘This epidemic is a way for Damascus to show that only the Syrian State is effective and that the different territories under its government must be reintegrated,’ estimates expert Fabrice Balanche.
The pandemic could also bring about the departure of US troops. But this would leave a security vacuum that would foster a resurgence of the self-proclaimed Islamic State group (ISIS).
The Syrian conflict has left more than 380,000 dead in nine years and millions of displaced people, especially vulnerable if the epidemic spreads.

Libya

Last month, the protagonists of the Libyan conflict celebrated the call for a UN ceasefire, before resuming hostilities.
Since the beginning of the year, violence has displaced 200,000 people, the majority in the capital, according to the International Organization for Migration (IOM).
On Monday, the fighting damaged a hospital in Tripoli, where patients with covid-19 are being treated, the organization regretted.
In this conflict, Turkey supports the UN-recognized government of Tripoli, which has been facing an offensive for a year from the Libyan strongman, Marshal Jalifa Haftar.
For Fabrice Balanche, a western withdrawal from conflicts in the region would favor pro-Haftar forces supported by Russia, Egypt and the United Arab Emirates.
Western countries are being hit hard by the pandemic, which could lead them to divert their military resources from foreign conflicts, but also to weaken the negotiation processes.

Iraq

In Iraq, while the war is over, the country remains threatened by a resurgence of ISIS in some regions, and tensions between the United States and Iran are not easing.
Washington has just deployed anti-aircraft defense batteries, raising fears of a further escalation with Iran, whose Iraqi support is believed to be responsible for launching rockets at the Green Zone in Baghdad, where the United States embassy is located, and on bases hosting American soldiers.
Share:

No comments:

Post a Comment

Note: Only a member of this blog may post a comment.

ad

Popular News

Recent Posts